Jump to content

Welcome to General Talk
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account now!
Photo

How Do You Learn To Speak English Fluently?


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1
jevika

jevika

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Locationindia

Hi how do you guys learn to speak English fluently?



#2
Marywang

Marywang

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

"Open your mouth;don't plan ahead."

The following article is from the book "How I Learned English".by Jian Kou Chang, edited by James St. ,Andre Charleen Gray and Nancy Sartin.

 

It is said that the Chung Tai English Institute in Taichung City forbids students to speak Chinese. If a student doesn't understand the word "I," the foreign teacher

gestures by putting his hand on his chest and keeps explaining until the student grasps the meaning.

This may be a bit exaggerated, but the institute does request the students to speak nothing but English in class. At summer camps, open to outsiders, five Chinese students share a room with an American college student so that the Chinese participants can practice speaking English continually.

The institute runs the Chung Tai English Broadcast, prints a bimonthly magazine and offers private tutoring.

There are three semesters a year. Each semester runs three nights a week for three months. There are six classes (or levels) taking place at the same time.

The institute is not a registered school.

Its chief purpose is to introduce the students to the Christian faith, rather than teaching English. But students learn English along the way, said director Sylvia Knapp.

"We emphasize conversational English because we find that most of the students come with a pretty good vocabulary, They know a lot of words, but they cannot open their mouths. So we try to find ways to get them to talk.

"For example, my class is doing a skit for our graduation ceremony. The students have to memorize their lines.

They find the lines they memorize will fit other situations: 'We are so pitiful. Our life is so hard.' You can say that in many situations. By learning these lines, it helps them to speak. Of course what they are saying in that play is correct English.

"The text book is a springboard. The kids feel they have to have it and the teachers feel better if they have got something. But we do a lot of supplementary materials. I don't say to the teacher to cover so many pages in their class. The main thing is to find all the activities you can that will help the students talk. The idea comes from what you see in the textbook but it's not in the textbook.

"The biggest problem is they don't have enough opportunity to practice speaking and their pronunciation sometimes is almost unintelligible. Maybe they

have learned incorrectly to begin with, and they are maybe bashful about opening their mouths.

"One thing is that they don't have opportunity to use English in conversation.

Artificial situation —if you go around and talk with your Chinese friends in English, practice English on each other—usually doesn't work too well. They need a person to talk to. I think Chinese love their face too much. You have to have a very thick skin to make a mistake, because that's how you learn. You learn by making mistakes and correcting them and going on to do it again. People who're not afraid just plunge in and say it, even if it's wrong. They progress faster than the ones that are shy.

"In fact, we encourage them to not even plan exactly what they're going to say first.

You think a sentence in your mind and then say it. Don't even bother to do that. Just start talking. Open your mouth even if you don't know how to finish the sentence.

Start it and it will come out. If it comes out wrong, we will help you fix it up.

"Usually, if you think the whole thing through before you start, it won't come out the same anyway. You got the idea, and once you open your mouth to start talking, you'll forget what you're going to say.

"The other thing is, you are thinking in Chinese. How do you get them to think in English rather than doing a translation?

Sometimes I know they made the mistake by doing a word-by-word translation from Chinese.

"Don't wait. Just start and plunge in.

My students make a lot of mistakes. I don't correct them all the time. If they are trying to express a thought in class and if I jump on every word, they will be more inhibited.

"If they say a sentence and it's not right, rather than telling them it's wrong, I'll just repeat back with the correction.

They may or may not pick up the fact that I have not said it exactly the same way they said it. Bui I don't do it in the way that makes them feel like: 'You are wrong. You are wrong.' We all have learned Chinese so we know how it feels to be tonguetied."



#3
Atutgorkhali123

Atutgorkhali123

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Locationnepal

There should be lots of english language class center in your area. You should join one of them choosing the best. That is just a start though.



#4
jevika

jevika

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Locationindia

Here is an inspiring story about learning a second language fluently..

Shullen Shaw, was the chief of (UPI), and ever expelled from Szechwan University for failing three subjects.

His methods of learning English:devouring novels.

Twenty-four years after becoming UPI bureau chief, Shaw says: "There's only one way you can't learn English well—if you don't learn it."

Shaw recounts: "When I graduated from high school, I recognized no more than 50 English words, and I attended college for less than a year. That's why I didn't start seriously to study English until I was 27 or 28.

"I didn't have anything to do after I dropped out of Szechwan University, so I became a classroom interpreter for American military officers. My English was pretty poor, and the American soldiers mumbled when they talked so a lot of what they said I couldn't translate. So I had to use the time at night when the others were playing cards to look up new words from the manual one by one. The next day in class, I understood.

"After coming to Taiwan, I continued studying English and at the same time looked for a job. I've been an English-language secretary for an import-export company, a diplomatic reporter for the Taiwan News Agency, and a translator for the Nationality Daily News.

"Back then, conditions sure weren't as good as they are now. Few people understood English and there weren't any foreign trading companies, travel agencies, cram schools, or videocassette recorders. Getting a teacher wasn't that easy either, so I had to just read whatever I could lay my hands-on and improve just by reading a lot of things in English.

"Before going to an English-language movie, I first bought the script and looked up the new words. If I didn't understand some places in the movie as I watched it, I'd go back and look them up and go back and see it again until I understood it.

"When I joined the UPI, it was because the foreigners were off on the weekends and needed someone to substitute for them. I've paid my dues. My English was just sufficient, but I didn't have enough writing experience. What I wrote, I had to file. There wasn't anyone to ask. That's how I got the hang of it.

"Often it wouldn't be until I got home at night that I'd find out 'Oh. I used this word wrong.'

"At the same time, I read the papers, magazines, science-fiction novels, detective novels, history books, trademarks, ads. Whatever I could get my hands on, I read.

"I even read when I use the toilet. I have to read when I go to bed. I can't go to sleep without reading. I also read when I wake up in the morning.

"One time, I got a book on the Battle of the Midway. It was 800 pages. I got into bed with it on Friday and read it until I got

out of bed on Monday. Except for eating and going into the bathroom, I finished reading it without interruption.

"When I read English books, I don't read fast. I read the plot, I read the English, I read the words, I read the sentences, I read the structure and the writing style. I think this is a good habit.

"I think I'm a good example for college students, especially seniors. They often say, 'Oh, it's too bad. Four years of college have passed just like that.' There's nothing to regret, really. Graduating from college is the start, not the end, of study.

"If you're going to work with English, you'll find out that what's learned in school is just a small part. After graduating, you learn even more.

"I don't have any diploma. In all my years of work, no one has wanted to see my diploma. As far as I'm concerned, diplomas aren't important. If you're just a

Kindergarten graduation but are better than a professor. I'll hire you." 



#5
Patric

Patric

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
  • LocationPleasanboro

 

Here is an inspiring story about learning a second language fluently..

 

Wow, quite a inspiring story....thank you for sharing with us...



#6
Kody

Kody

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts

do_not_study_grammar_too_much.jpg



#7
superqualicast

superqualicast

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • LocationIndia

By speakin english in public or friend circle, by Watching english movie, By reading english book or any material I can improve my English and speak fluently in English.



#8
makaniel17

makaniel17

    Settling In

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Locationphilippines

A British reporter taped a briefing given by Robert Shyu, deputy director of marketing information for the China External Trade Development Council. The reporter said she would take the tape back home "to challenge anyone to tell that the narrator is Chinese."

Shyu said he learned English by read­ing and "digesting" films, and that a good English teacher at his high school in Taiwan was his original inspiration.

"I spend at least two hours a day read­ing to find sentence patterns for self-prac- tice. When I learn a word, I reject its definition in Chinese. I absorb its English definition and look for usage examples.

"If I see the word 'equip' and the ex­ample in the dictionary is, 'This office is equipped with all the modern facilities,' I make up, 'This old factory is equipped with nothing but useless machinery.'

"I use odd moments such as when I'm riding the bus to review my patterns. I have al­ways note cards or a notebook with me.

"Writing is the most difficult thing (for me). When I was studying at Fu Jen Catholic University, I hired a brilliant teacher, Shih Hsueh-pan, to teach me writ­ing. She pointed out that my writing was done with sheer artificiality. She didn't correct sentence by sentence; she tore page by page. We sat there and discussed (my writing) and she'd say: 'What is it you want to say?'

"Back then, the greatest pain was having spent so much time remembering words. I remembered the words correctly, but they came out wrong in writing.

"It was quite a lesson and after that, every time I said something or wrote some­thing, I checked and double-checked it.

"After getting to the United States, I wrote one composition every day. I gave one to everyone I met and asked him to cor­rect it, students and teachers alike. So the few people I knew all shunned me, I'm afraid.

"This habit I haven't broken for over 10 years. But now I may not hand over a whole composition; sometimes I present one page. When I get hold of someone and start talking , though, it'll be for an hour.

"I think I've done much reading, but I'm afraid to forget so I still do what I did in my younger days: look for sentence pat­terns and practice out loud. I pretend the author's talking to me and I have to answer him. With this I've had much to say.

"When people say I speak like an Englishman, I say, 'It's not an achieve­ment but a wish fulfilled.'

"I still remember to this day something an American professor once told me:

 

'Whenever you are told your English is good, in the back of your mind there should be a voice telling you: That's a lie.'"   



#9
Trent

Trent

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • LocationOrlando

My advice is that you learn enlgish by talking to bative speakers and also watching every tv show and movie in english helps a lot.



#10
louiza

louiza

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts

Get yourself some Telemundo on cable lol.



#11
kevineastman

kevineastman

    New To GT

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • LocationUSA

Hi i am learning English from Academy in my city area....

I have complete my level 1 and willing for level 2

still learning i have to complete 4 level to be a good English Man......



#12
Bertrand Russel

Bertrand Russel

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 33 posts

Hi, kevineastman

May I ask what text book are you using for study English now?



#13
ledinsek

ledinsek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
  • LocationHagapolis

Learn phrases (chunks), not just words, e.g. idioms, ‘bad hair day’, ‘piece of cake’; collocations, ‘have breakfast’, ‘do homework’; polite expressions, ‘Thanks a lot!’, ‘You’re welcome’, ‘All the best’, phrasal verbs,  ‘to look after’, ‘to take care of’; These are the phrases that go together.



#14
CrypticVPS

CrypticVPS

    Settling In

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

In the process of learning English, students should become comfortable with English pronunciation as they practice to make it perfect.


[align=center]Looking for Premium Hosting. Check US out at CrypticVPS.com
Follow US on Twitter @CrypticVPS[/align]

#15
hemantlatawa

hemantlatawa

    Settling In

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Locationindia

Learn & speaking engilsh today is very easy without going any speaking center because today so many website do it for free you just once login that site.



#16
Patric

Patric

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
  • LocationPleasanboro

Learn & speaking engilsh today is very easy without going any speaking center because today so many website do it for free you just once login that site.

Are there any websites to help people learn English feminine nouns?



#17
Hopwood04

Hopwood04

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 30 posts

I watch English Movie with sub titles....   It help me to understand pronunciation of Words.

 

read english news paper regularly.  it keeps vocabulary up to date   :)

 

talk with friends and family in english language.   practice difficult words in front of mirror.



#18
Patric

Patric

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
  • LocationPleasanboro

I watch English Movie with sub titles....   It help me to understand pronunciation of Words.

 

read english news paper regularly.  it keeps vocabulary up to date   :)

 

talk with friends and family in english language.   practice difficult words in front of mirror.

Thank you Hopwood04, they are very useful advices indeed.



#19
Hopwood04

Hopwood04

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 30 posts

Thank you Hopwood04, they are very useful advices indeed.

You always Welcome!



#20
Henry

Henry

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts

Are you looking forward for funny ways to learn English language? Well, amusing fun activities, such as word games, and listen to the funny stories like this....

 

The Break In

This was Tammy's first car. It was an iridescent green color that shimmered in the sunlight. Tammy had saved her money for years to buy this car. She had first taken a job when she was fourteen years old with the thought of purchasing this exact car already in her mind.

At the age of fourteen, the only job she could get was delivering newspapers. Every penny she earned was saved in a savings account at the nearest bank.

 

At sixteen she was hired by a fast food restaurant. Every paycheck went straight into the bank. Her friends would ask her to go shopping for clothes and she would decline. Tammy preferred to stay home and dream of her future new car.

Now, as the car salesman congratulated her and shook her hand, she realized that her dream had come true. At long last, the most beautiful car in the world was finally hers.

As Tammy drove off the car lot, she thought of where she would go first. She decided to stop at the place where she worked to show off to her co-workers. Tammy pressed the automatic car lock as she got out and headed inside. Her co-workers joined her at Jiie window, to look at her beautiful new car. To Tammy's delight, they were all very impressed. They congratulated her. Tammy had to pick up some dry cleaning from the place next door. She said goodbye to her co-workers and went into the dry cleaners. As Tammy walked back out to her car with her dry cleaning over her shoulder, she thought of where to go next.

She fumbled in her coat pocket for the car key. Tammy couldn't find it. "That's odd," she said. Then something terrible happened. She discovered where the key was. It was still in the ignition inside the car.

Tammy bent one of the coat hangers from her dry cleaning. She tried to shove it through the car window to reach down and open the locked door. "Miss," she heard someone behind her say. "Not now!" she snapped, "Can't you see I'm trying to break into my car?" "No," said the man, "I see that you're trying to break into my car."

Tammy looked around. It was her boss. He pointed past her. Tammy could see that her car was parked right in front of her boss's.

He was right. She had been trying to break into the wrong car. She realized her key was in her pants pocket and not in her coat.

She started to walk to her car. "Miss," her boss said, "Is there anything you'd like to say to me?" Tammy smiled sheepishly. "You have great taste in cars, sir," she said.

Comprehension Questions

What do you think it would be like to find out your new car had just been stolen?

Do you think Tammy handled the uncomfortable situation with her boss well? What would you have done?

How do you feel about saving to buy a big purchase or buying it with a loan?

Who would you want to see your new car first and why?

Why are automobiles bad for the environment? Do you see any other downsized to automobiles?






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users